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Ethics with an Asterisk: Anthropology's Conditional Respect of American Indians

There still remains a group of Anthropologists who obsess over the peopling of the Americas.  Popular media soaks these published theories up and wrings them out upon the uneducated masses who use said articles as biblical text written to justify Manifest Destiny.  These publications have tremendous impacts on the resource rights of Tribes and often times are undermined by new theories.  Yet, little has been done to rectify failed theories or criticize failed theorists. Popular media ignores instances where scientists have been wrong and cost Tribes access to their resources.  In a world so quick to call out every nuance of celebrity behavior, there seems to be a double standard in coverage of failed academic "discoveries".  Academia has had significant impacts on...

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The Extraordinary Contribution of Women in Plateau Societies: An Examination by a Plateau Anthropologist

Overall, there was a heavy communal aspect in Plateau societies that is unparalleled and difficult to understand in western terms.  Academia has done little to shed truth on these roles, as academics have failed to grasp concepts....

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My Top Three Online Resources for Family Tree Research

Aside from literature searches and consulting my usual books as references for research, I have three online fallbacks that always jolt my research back to life after hitting a dead end.  These three online resources have been super helpful, especially when researching family trees. 

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Is the Archaeological Resources Protection Act of 1979 Legitimizing the Desecration of Native American Sacred Sites?

     When I entered the field of cultural resource management, I thought I was walking into a field dedicated to the protection of Native American heritage.  A small part of me still believes that is everyone's common goal.  Then one of our tribal leaders laid a piece of wisdom on me that quickly changed my expectations.  He told me, "sovereignty is a living thing.  We are not born inherently understanding the Treaty, our culture or our rights.  It is incumbent upon us [as tribes] to teach the public about our rights spelled out under the Treaty."       After 11 years with the Tribe, the most frustrating and hopeless part of my job is responding to Archaeological Resources Protection Act...

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